sirromdrawde

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(Source: stlara)

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(Source: normasjeanes)

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life-in-the-cheaper-seats:

Joan Jett’s jacket. Notice the pins.

"keep abortion legal"

"If she says no, it’s rape"

"Pro fucking choice"

This jacket is from about thirty years ago. These issues were big then. Thirty years later, these issues are still present. I was amazed to find these pins on the jacket, and realize this, because I would have thought, back then, if I was alive, that those issues would be solved by NOW.

But they aren’t. Joan Jett knew what was up.

Why can’t we take a minute and soak in her “bad reputation” and think about how in thirty years, abortion and rape culture STILL are huge issues.

Photos courtesy of EMP museum in Seattle, Washington.

(Source: bourgeoismenagerie)

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edofthedead:

Old art work by Shaky Kane

edofthedead:

Old art work by Shaky Kane

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suicidewatch:

The Nation of Ulysses

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zuky:

im1004:

1968, Asian American high school students attend the Black Panther Party funeral rally for Bobby Hutton,16 years old BPP member.

Nice pic and clip of history. That year, in 1968, my Mom was a new immigrant to the US from China, but she immediately identified with the Black Panthers struggle against racism and began attending civil rights and anti-war rallies, first in Berkeley and then in Chicago. When I was born in New York in the 1970s, my parents were printing a Chinese language progressive socialist newsletter out of our garage. That’s my Asian American upbringing.

zuky:

im1004:

1968, Asian American high school students attend the Black Panther Party funeral rally for Bobby Hutton,16 years old BPP member.

Nice pic and clip of history. That year, in 1968, my Mom was a new immigrant to the US from China, but she immediately identified with the Black Panthers struggle against racism and began attending civil rights and anti-war rallies, first in Berkeley and then in Chicago. When I was born in New York in the 1970s, my parents were printing a Chinese language progressive socialist newsletter out of our garage. That’s my Asian American upbringing.

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magnius159:

The Asian American Movement: protesters protest police brutality and racial profiling during the 1970′s (photo credit: Corky Lee)

In the wake of the #AsianPrivilege response hash-tag to #NotYourAsianSidekick and #BlackPowerYellowPeril, it appears as if (among other misguided ideas) there is a prevailing notion out there that, in contrast to other minorities, Asian Americans “lack a history of resistance” (or that we think we do), and that this invisibility and dearth of civil rights history actually confers upon the Asian American community a form of racial privilege.
Putting aside the second half of that assertion regarding privilege for a minute, there’s one other major problem: any argument that relies upon the assumption that Asian Americans lack a history of resistance is patently ahistorical.
Like really, really, really wrong. Like insultingly wrong.
After the jump, here are 10 examples of Asian American’s history of oppression and political resistance.

magnius159:

The Asian American Movement: protesters protest police brutality and racial profiling during the 1970′s (photo credit: Corky Lee)

In the wake of the #AsianPrivilege response hash-tag to #NotYourAsianSidekick and #BlackPowerYellowPeril, it appears as if (among other misguided ideas) there is a prevailing notion out there that, in contrast to other minorities, Asian Americans “lack a history of resistance” (or that we think we do), and that this invisibility and dearth of civil rights history actually confers upon the Asian American community a form of racial privilege.

Putting aside the second half of that assertion regarding privilege for a minute, there’s one other major problem: any argument that relies upon the assumption that Asian Americans lack a history of resistance is patently ahistorical.

Like really, really, really wrong. Like insultingly wrong.

After the jump, here are 10 examples of Asian American’s history of oppression and political resistance.

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